|  e-ISSN: 2147-5156

Original article | Turkish Journal of Teacher Education 2021, Vol. 10(1) 54-69

Teachers' Working Conditions in Primary and Secondary Schools in Ethiopia

Shimeles Assefa, Temesgen Fereja, Teshome Tola, Abrha Asfaw, Girma Zewdie, Hailemariam Kekeba, Desalegn Fufa, Habtamu Wodaj

pp. 54 - 69   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2104-15-0004.R1

Published online: June 30, 2021  |   Number of Views: 4  |  Number of Download: 28


Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of teachers' working conditions at primary and secondary schools levels in Ethiopia. The study involved 688 teachers at primary and secondary schools. Teachers' perception of the status of their working conditions was assessed using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. While the quantitative data were analyzed using independent sample-test and one-way ANOVA statistics, the qualitative data were analyzed thematically and used to substantiate and triangulate the quantitative analysis results. The results reveal that school teachers did not take any position on the overall status of their working conditions and preferred neutral positions. Although the teachers showed neutrality regarding the status of their working conditions, the qualitative results suggested that they tend to have negative perceptions towards their working conditions. The majority of the teachers at the sample primary and secondary schools indicated that they were not satisfied with their incomes and benefits. Similarly, the qualitative data shows that they had dissatisfaction with these variables. In terms of teachers' perception of working conditions, the result from one-way ANOVA analysis shows the significant mean difference among regional states for primary schools but no significant difference for counterpart secondary schools. This would mean that secondary school teachers were not satisfied with the income and benefits (IB) they earn whereas their primary school counterparts did not take any position. Concerning gender, in both schools, both male and female teachers preferred neutral positions on the perception of the working condition in the schools. The result from independent sample t-test analysis revealed that primary school female teachers perceived the condition of policy environment, management and evaluation system more positively than male teachers but secondary school male teachers were not satisfied with incomes and benefits than females. It was suggested that school management, regional education bureaus and the Ministry of Education should work jointly towards alleviating difficulties related to income and benefits.

Keywords: Working Condition, Teaching Effectiveness, Quality Education


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Assefa, S., Fereja, T., Tola, T., Asfaw, A., Zewdie, G., Kekeba, H., Fufa, D. & Wodaj, H. (2021). Teachers' Working Conditions in Primary and Secondary Schools in Ethiopia . Turkish Journal of Teacher Education, 10(1), 54-69.

Harvard
Assefa, S., Fereja, T., Tola, T., Asfaw, A., Zewdie, G., Kekeba, H., Fufa, D. and Wodaj, H. (2021). Teachers' Working Conditions in Primary and Secondary Schools in Ethiopia . Turkish Journal of Teacher Education, 10(1), pp. 54-69.

Chicago 16th edition
Assefa, Shimeles, Temesgen Fereja, Teshome Tola, Abrha Asfaw, Girma Zewdie, Hailemariam Kekeba, Desalegn Fufa and Habtamu Wodaj (2021). "Teachers' Working Conditions in Primary and Secondary Schools in Ethiopia ". Turkish Journal of Teacher Education 10 (1):54-69.

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